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i want to talk to my teen about pregnancy.

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My child asked me about pregnancy, what do I say?

Although this may seem like a scary conversation, it’s best not to panic. If your child is asking you about pregnancy, it is a good sign they trust and value what you have to say.


Don’t feel like you have to know all of the answers right away. It’s okay if you don’t know how to answer their question.


Below are some conversation guidelines that may help:


  • Acknowledge that you have heard the question. Try:“Thanks for asking me” or“That’s a good question”Do not respond angrily, with accusations, or with judgement. Remember, if your child is asking you about pregnancy, it means they value what you have to say.


  • If needed, ask a clarifying question. Depending on the age of your child, they could’ve just overheard something and are curious or are wanting to learn more about the process of pregnancy. Try:“Why do you ask?”“What have you heard about pregnancy?”“Did you hear or learn something recently?”Do not judge or shame whatever your child does or does not know about pregnancy. Use this time to understand where they are coming from and how you can best answer their question.


  • Take this opportunity to discuss your hopes for their future, expectations, and values.


  • Respond to their question with an age-appropriate response such as: “Pregnancy is when a baby grows and develops inside a person's womb also known as a uterus.
    You don’t have to know everything about pregnancy. In fact, it’s okay if you do not know everything and admit that to your child. By doing so, you can encourage your child to continue learning about pregnancy by finding an expert together. Example responses: “You know I don’t know a whole about it though. Why don’t we look at a good resource online together” or “I don’t know a lot about pregnancy myself. Let’s schedule an appointment to talk to a doctor together.”


  • Thank them again for coming to you and let them know you would like to have more conversations together like this one.


  • Follow through. If you told your child you would like to read online together or visit a doctor, actually make it happen. Do not put it off or think they will just forget about it. You want to position yourself as the trusted and reliable source of information.

My child asked me about pregnancy, what do I say?

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